Mujahedin Khalq; what are they really after?! (aka; MKO, MEK, NCRI, Rajavi cult)

Mujahedin Khalq; what are they really after?! (aka; MKO, MEK, NCRI, Rajavi cult)

Maryam Rajavi Saddam's private army NCRIA.Sepinoud, Nejat Bloggers, May 22 2014: …  Mujahedin Khalq official websites have announced for a gathering in Paris on June 27.every year in June- on the anniversary of the beginning of the armed struggle of the group – the organization holds a Gathering Mujahedin Khalq; what are they really after?!along with some big names. The same as every other rally the …

Maryam Rajavi Saddam's private army NCRILe Figaro: Mojahedin Khalq (aka MKO, MEK, Rajavi cult) Fight alogside insurgents in Syria

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Mujahedin Khalq; what are they really after?! (aka; MKO, MEK, NCRI, Rajavi cult)

Mujahedin Khalq official websites have announced for a gathering in Paris on June 27.every year in June- on the anniversary of the beginning of the armed struggle of the group – the organization holds a Gathering Mujahedin Khalq; what are they really after?!along with some big names.

The same as every other rally the group has to hire attendees since group does not enjoy any support among Iranians.

Ghorban Ali Hussein Nejad, a defected member of MKO who currently lives in a charity center for refugees in France states that the MKO is vigorously recruiting attendees from refugee camps in exchange for money. Hussein Nejad says the group is recruiting African Arabs and Afghanis to participate in the so called “Huge gathering of Iranians” as acting extras.[1]

That is the MKO leaders must not only pay speakers to sing their praises at their rallies, but also the audience members.

The PR machine of Mojahedin Khalq as the only active part of the organization is hard at work during the year to hold demonstrations, rallies and events under different pretexts and in different places. It organizes trips for the so-called leader of the group Maryam Rajavi.

Scorned by many Iranians as a cult and for its long alliance with Saddam Hussein which causes the group’s having no base within Iran and among its own nation, MKO‘s efforts are all concerted to gain attention and support of the western powers.

In fact the Mujahedin Khalq’s decades long, intense and well-funded lobbying efforts to get itself delisted was a prerequisite in its struggle to show itself as a legitimate opposition group to Iran current government and as a democratic alternative .

Although the MKO’s opposition to the Iranian government earned its support and promotions and it got delisted through some deft lobbying, still it has never been considered as a viable alternative.

Indeed it is not new in the continuous policy of the United States or other European governments to embrace the terrorist and violent so called opposition groups to press the governments that do not follow their bids and get in their way.

Still as a group whose leadership has been living outside Iran for three decades, the PMOI has limited value to them, and its association with Saddam Hussein, Iraq’s dictator until the allied invasion of 2003, makes it an unpalatable ally.[2]

The Western governments have come to the consensus to negotiate with the current government of Iran and even If they think of an alternative, MKO is not the group they mull over.

The State Department’s report regards the Rajavis as “fundamentally undemocratic” and “not a viable alternative to the current government of Iran.”[3]

Eldar Memedov; the Political Advisor for the Social-Democratic Group in the Foreign Affairs Committee of the European Parliament in its recently published article writes:”The foreign policy decision-making bodies of the EU — the Council of the EU and the External Action Service (EEAS) — do not consider the MEK a serious alternative to the current government in Tehran, as it has virtually no support among the Iranian population. [4]

Mamedov asserts:”The dominant EU line now clearly favors diplomacy with Iran, which will, hopefully, lead to a final deal over Tehran’s controversial nuclear program.”[5]

Indeed the delisting was symbolic and brought nothing for the group but paved the way for the west to use it as a tool against Iran.

The MKO’s efforts in derailing diplomacy on the nuclear programme beared no fruit as diplomacy is working and Iran and the 6 world powers are negotiating on the final stages of the agreement. As a group which have been on the list of terrorist organizations and has been repeatedly condemned by the UN of violating the Rights of its own members, the MKO’ propaganda on the issue of Human Rights in Iran is also futile.

The group talks about democracy in Iran while their own members do not have any freedom and live in a deplorable condition. The group’s leadership do not have any sympathy for the Iranian people or even its own members. They only care for keeping their own luxury life style,since they are now well aware that achieving power in Iran is an illusive dream.

A.Sepinoud

References:

[1] http://www.nejatngo.org/fa/post.aspx?id=18993

[2] Vogel, Toby, A credible alternative for Iran?, European Voice, February23,2012

[3] 1994 US State Department Report on the People’s Mojahedin of Iran

[4] Mamedov, Eldar, The MEK’s Influence in EU Politics Matters, LobeLog, May6,2014

[5]ibid

Mojahedin Khalq (MKO, MEK, Rajavi cult) in Paris for talks
La secte Iranienne (MEK) et ses Gourous Maryam et Massoud


http://youtu.be/dqtqFaQ0j2E

Also read:
https://iran-interlink.org/wordpress/?p=3557

Diary Of An MKO Rent-A-Crowd Demonstrator (Mojahedin Khalq, MEK, Rajavi cult)

Radio Free Europe, June 27 2013: … Enough. I had to find the exit door. Near the exit doors, where organizers were distributing salmon sandwiches and kebabs, I heard a few people speaking Kyrgyz, my mother tongue. They were three students who traveled from Germany. 9:28 p.m.: I spent the rest of the day sightseeing in Paris before returning to our bus. JUNE 24: 11:57 a.m.: We arrived back …


Daniel Zucker, Maryam Rajavi and ALi Safavi

Link to the source


Kyrgyz student Alina Alymkulova recounts how she was recruited to travel from Prague to Paris to attend a rally for the Mujahedin-e Khalq Organization (MKO), an Iranian opposition movement in exile.

The MKO and its Paris-based political wing, the National Council of Resistance in Iran, are often at the center of controversy. The MKO, which advocates regime change in Iran, was only recently delisted as a terrorist organization by the United States and the European Union.

The National Council of Resistance in Iran and its president-elect, Maryam Rajavi, are known for organizing mass rallies that attract Iranian exiles and VIP supporters from around the world. But as Alymkulova’s diary makes clear, some of the tens of thousands of supporters who attended the June 22 rally in Paris might have been motivated by more than their wish for a free Iran.

JUNE 20

9 p.m.: I was in Prague listening to music online and checking news on social media when an advertisement caught my eye. It offered a weekend trip to Paris, a city I always dreamed of visiting at least once during my lifetime.

The price was amazingly cheap — round-trip by bus and bed and breakfast at a four-star hotel would cost me only 35 euros ($46).

I wrote to the trip organizer and discovered there was a catch, but it didn’t bother me. The organizer explained that I would have to take part in a rally in Paris for a few hours. He promised the protest would be peaceful and violence-free, and that I would return home safe and sound.

JUNE 21

9 p.m.: I arrived at a bus station in Prague along with a friend, a fellow student from Kyrgyzstan. Just as the trip organizer said last night, there were eight buses waiting to take us to Paris.

Most of the “protesters” were young and obviously students like me. I met many Russians, Ukrainians, Czechs, and students from Asian countries who were all recruited via the Internet.

More than an hour later we were still at the bus station. People kept coming. It was cold and rainy, and some people began to drink alcohol to keep warm. Some others started to chant slogans: “Freedom to Iranian parrots!” and “Organizers should bring beer!”

I approached two Russian girls to see if they might have a better idea about the purpose of our trip. “To defend the rights of Iranian women,” said one of the girls. “To meet handsome Frenchmen,” said the other. “Who cares about Iranian women?”

11:12 p.m.: Finally, the trip organizers arrived and let us on the buses. The journey had begun.

JUNE 22

11:56 a.m.: After a lengthy bus journey and a sleepless night, we arrived in Paris. The organizers told us we had the whole day to see the city.

I met a student who traveled from Germany to take part in the same rally. But he was sure we were going to attend a rally in support of changes in Iraq, not Iran.

JUNE 23

12:52 a.m.: The hotel was about 60 kilometers outside Paris. We were promised a night in a four-star hotel, but I wouldn’t even give one star to the shabby place the organizers brought us to. “Well, what else would you expect for a 35 euro, all-inclusive trip to Paris?” someone said as we stood in line to use the toilet.

11:42 a.m.: I overslept and missed my breakfast. Those who woke up early said the breakfast consisted of milk and a sandwich.

1:16 p.m.: The buses took us to some strange place not far from Charles de Gaulle Airport. We were given papers explaining where to go and what to do. Cameras were not allowed. As we exited the bus, I resigned myself to the idea that running away was not an option — people were guarding the area.

There were yellow-and-purple flags hanging everywhere. The name “Maryam Rajavi” was written on the flags. Well, at least I knew the name of the person behind this massive event.

The endless sight of buses from many different countries was somewhat alarming. Security guards checked us as we entered a building. They stopped me because I had kept my camera inside my backpack despite the organizers’ warning. Amazingly, the guards let me take my camera in after I paid them a couple of euros. Within seconds I was inside the building.

2:23 p.m.: There were at least 10,000 people inside. Strange music was playing. All the participants were given coupons for a free drink and sandwich. We ate and drank and then joined the rally being held in what appeared to be a huge stadium.

There were headphones on each seat, apparently so we could listen to direct translations of the speeches. I suddenly realized that there was a woman standing next to me. She was covered head-to-toe and kept saying, “Allahu Akbar.”

Enough. I had to find the exit door.

Near the exit doors, where organizers were distributing salmon sandwiches and kebabs, I heard a few people speaking Kyrgyz, my mother tongue. They were three students who traveled from Germany.

9:28 p.m.: I spent the rest of the day sightseeing in Paris before returning to our bus.

JUNE 24

11:57 a.m.: We arrived back in Prague. I was feeling down, and even the souvenirs I bought in Paris could not cheer me up. In thinking about the whole experience, a saying comes to mind: “Only a mousetrap has free cheese.”

Translated from Russian by Farangis Najibullah

Also read:

Mojahedin Khalq (MKO, MEK, Rajavi cult) in Paris for talks

Alexander Turnbull/Christopher Moore, Fracne 24, June 23 2013: … During the 1970s, the Mujahideen led the fight against Iran’s shah but swiftly turned against the religious rulers who replaced him. A bloody struggle ensued, followed by decades in exile. In 1986, Massoud set up the National Liberation army in Iraq. Money and weapons flooded in to support then-Iraqi president Saddam Hussein’s …

Mojahedin Khalq (MKO, MEK, Rajavi cult), June 20, anniversary of collapse of a dream

Mojahedin Khalq_Rajavi cult_June20Mazda Parsi, Nejat Association, June 22 2013: … June signifies another dishonorable date in MKO’s history too. Following the arrest of Maryam Rajavi by French Police in her base in the Parisian suburb Auver Sur d’Oise MKO leaders made members commit suicide as an act of complaint. Some members of the group set themselves on fire in European cities. Their act resulted in several …

Iran’s election a setback for Washington’s anti-Iran lobby as Mojahedin Khalq goes into a tailspin

Massoud Khodabandeh, Middle East Strategy Consultants, June 22 2013: … And Rajavi is ready. Or is he? There is a lot happening behind the scenes that belies the group’s boasts and declarations. Behind the scenes at the lobbying office the disintegration of the MEK is gaining momentum and is likely to implode the group in the near future leaving a mere shell. Opening a lobbying office should be seen as …

Wondering at those Americans who stand under the flag of
Mojahedin Khalq (MKO, MEK, NCRI, Rajavi cult) only to
LOBBY for the murderers of their servicemen