Popular Mobilization Forces PMF Parade . What Were Messages?

Popular Mobilization Forces PMF Parade . What Were Messages?

Popular Mobilization Forces PMF Parade in AshrafABANA, June 30 2021:… The ant-terror movement’s parade was held at a camp in Diyala that was once called Camp Ashraf and hosted anti-Iranian terrorist organization, Mujahideen Khalgh Organization (MKO) harbored by dictator Saddam Hussein. The ceremony was attended by Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi, Defense Minister Juma Anad, Interior Minister Othman al-Ghanemi, National Security Advisor Qassem al-A’araji, the Chief of General Staff Abdelamir Yarullah, and a number other senior army commanders.  Popular Mobilization Forces PMF Parade In Ashraf 

The Life of Camp Ashraf Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Massoud KhodabandehThe Life of Camp Ashraf. Mojahedin-e Khalq – Victims of Many Masters. By Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) and Massoud Khodabandeh

Popular Mobilization Forces PMF Parade . What Were Messages? 

Analysis – Iraq’s Popular Mobilization Forces military parade: What were messages?

Marking the seventh anniversary of their foundation, the Popular Mobilization Forces (PMF) held a military parade for the first time on June 26. The parade was covered massively by regional and international media, with many of them suggesting that it marked the PMF entry to a new era of its life.

The ant-terror movement’s parade was held at a camp in Diyala that was once called Camp Ashraf and hosted anti-Iranian terrorist organization, Mujahideen Khalgh Organization (MKO) harbored by dictator Saddam Hussein. The ceremony was attended by Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi, Defense Minister Juma Anad, Interior Minister Othman al-Ghanemi, National Security Advisor Qassem al-A’araji, the Chief of General Staff Abdelamir Yarullah, and a number other senior army commanders.

Popular Mobilization Forces PMF Parade in Ashraf

Popular Mobilization Forces PMF Parade

As mentioned, this parade enjoyed a very wide coverage from media and political observers. But the question is about the political, security, and symbolic messages that this event sent.

The interesting point is that the military procession of the PMF was held at a time when this force has been widely attacked by the enemies of the Axis of Resistance especially the US and some Arab countries in recent years. But the PMF’s demonstration of force showed that the enemies plots have gone nowhere and the voluntary units have emerged even stronger than before and continue their march towards their ideals.

PMF established in Iraq’s security and political stability 

The massive parade marks the establishment of this popular force in the country’s power structure. Following ISIS attack on Mosul, the grand Shiite Cleric Ayatollah Sayyed Ali al-Sistani issued a fatwa for taking up arms against terrorism on June 13, 2014, at which point Iraqi Shiites mobilized in various units within the PMF. The popular forces’ entry to the anti-ISIS war of was game-changing to the battlegrounds.

Over 40 units constituted the PMF, with their role undeniable in obliteration of ISIS on the ground. It has around 120,000 fighters and the PM is its top commander-in-chief. Faleh Al-Fayyad is its commander and Sadegh al-Saadawi is its chief of general staff. Hadi al-Amiri is the deputy and field commander of the popular forces. The Fatah coalition represents the PMF in the Iraqi parliament. Currently, the force focuses on expulsion of illegitimate American troops from Iraq, as this agenda has legal backing provided by the parliament’s bill for the government to expel the foreign forces. Amid the home and foreign conspiracies against the PMF, the military parade has much to tell and vindicates establishment in the country’s security structure.

Legal and political establishment 

It should be taken into account that since its foundation, the PMF faced internal and external opposition. The opponents call for disbanding of these forces and prevention of their activities. They argue that the PMF are parallel to the regular army. The opponents are extremely afraid of the PMF closeness to Iran, a country that provided unwavering support to the anti-terror operations. A Sunni political community, led by the former parliament speaker Osama al-Nujaifi, is the main opponent of the PMF existence. Another opponent is the Kurdish Democratic Party (KDP) led by Masoud Barzani.

In a wider range, part of secular politicians, from both Shiites and Sunnis, are opposed to these forces. Outside the country, the US is the top actor calling for their disbanding. Saudi Arabia, the Israeli regime, the UAE, and the European countries also take hostile stances against the groups. All this opposition comes while the PMF was recognized as part of Iraqi armed forces in November 2016. In March 2018, the ten PM Haider al-Abadi ordered their merger into the armed forces. The recent parade shattered the speculations about their disbandment. The presence of political and military leaders bore witness to establishment of the PMF in the nation’s political and legal establishment.

PMF, a trans-religious force in Iraq 

The Parade also demonstrated that the PMF is a trans-religious and trans-sectarian force. The reality is that Iraq has been mired in sectarian tensions since 2003, but the Popular Mobilization Forces showed that it is possible to transcend religious and ethno-sectarian boundaries. In fact, although the Shiites were at the core of the PMF, Sunni Arabs, Kurds, Christians, and Yazidis also joined it, and they are still at the top of decision-making process.

Link to the source

Popular Mobilization Forces PMF Parade . What Were Messages? 

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https://iran-interlink.org/wordpress/ashraf-camp-massacre-revisited/

Ashraf Camp Massacre Revisited – Victim’s family speak out

Ashraf Camp Massacre Revisited Iran Interlink, January 05 2021:… In 2011, Iraqi police tried to reclaim land that had been illegally gifted to the MEK by Saddam Hussein. MEK leaders sent unarmed rank and file members to ‘resist to the death’. Some threw themselves under armoured vehicles, others were shot attacking the police. Massoud and Maryam Rajavi are responsible for the violence that day. They are responsible for the deaths of these people. Ashraf Camp Massacre Revisited – Victim’s family speak out 

massoud khodabandeh Iraq 2011Diyala Governor: Human Rights, Deporting MEK, Imposing the Laws, non negotiable

Ashraf Camp Massacre Revisited – Victim’s family speak out

In 2011, Iraqi police tried to reclaim land that had been illegally gifted to the MEK by Saddam Hussein. MEK leaders sent unarmed rank and file members to ‘resist to the death’. Some threw themselves under armoured vehicles, others were shot attacking the police. Massoud and Maryam Rajavi are responsible for the violence that day. They are responsible for the deaths of these people.

Message of Ms Mahniz Sepahpour, Nasser Sepahpour’s sister killed by the Mojahedin-e Khalq (MEK), to Albanian government officials and the World Health Organization (WHO)

Transcript:

In the name of God

Hello, I am Mahnaz Sepahpour, siter of the late Nasser Sepahpour, killed by the MEK. I am from Iran, from the city of Urmia. In April 2011, my brother was killed by the MEK during clashes with Iraqi forces at Camp Ashraf. The MEK claimed him as a martyr. They wrote a will on his behalf and talked to us, and they abused his injured and then lifeless body.

We have tried for years by appealing to Human Rights Organisations to save Nasser (The body) from the clutches of this cult but unfortunately, we did not succeed. My parents passed away and they did not mange to see their only son. My brother was not political type, and he did not know the MEK at all. He was deceived by the MEK when he left the country and was taken to Camp Ashraf (In Iraq), but Nasser escaped from them and went to Turkey to achieve a better life. He planned to get to a European country from there where he could find a suitable job, earn enough money and then return home to his family.

Unfortunately, Massoud Rajavi and his collaborators ruined all his and my parents’ wishes. They got hold of Nasser again and using fake identities as staff of an employment agency in Europe, made false promises of a good job opportunity. He was put on a plane destined for Iraq. According to former members who have managed to escape from Camp Ashraf, Nasser had tried to escape from the camp several times but failed. According to his friends, Nasser was both ill and disturbed. Nasser had many dreams that were ruined by Rajavi and his collaborators, and they took his life like other young people in pursuit of their treacherous goals, and kept his parents waiting up to the last day of their lives until they departed longing to see their only son.

The MEK forced Nasser to give a compulsory interview on MEK TV which was the worst act of the cult against us and Nasser. Rajavi agents tried many times in their contacts with our family when Nasser was alive to extort money from us in his name and get money to pursue the dirty goals of betraying their homeland. For 20 years we were unaware that Nasser was in the MEK camp. We looked for him everywhere for 20 years without knowing where he is and what he is doing. Is this fair?

Ashraf Camp Massacre Revisited

Ashraf Camp Massacre Revisited

After he died, we asked for his body, which is the just right of every family as next of kin. We received nothing but insults and accusations from the Rajavi cult elements.

I am now addressing Albanian government officials as well as human rights bodies. Please do not let those who are trapped in the MEK camp in that country have the same destiny as my brother Nasser. Many families are now waiting for a call and a simple visit with their loved ones who are trapped in the cult in your country. Please help them.

I recently heard that a large number of trapped members in the MEK camp in Albania have been infected with coronavirus and died, but the organisation hides their deaths and buries them covertly at night.

In this regard, I also ask the WHO not to let those people who have no access to the outside world and who are deprived of Albanian heath care, die. Their families are worried and are waiting for your concrete actions. Please do something before it is too late. God says that he breathed his soul into mankind’s body. Each of us was created for a purpose without exception, to be God’s successors on earth. Now ask yourself how many times have you acted like a successor? Now is the time to save the lives of people trapped in the MEK camp in Albania. Please help. Fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters, spouses and children are waiting.

Link to the source, Rahenoo website (Persian)

Ashraf Camp Massacre Revisited – Victim’s family speak out

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Khodabandeh Massoud Baghdad ConferenceReport on Baghdad Conference – Terrorist MEK to be expelled from Iraq

anne_Khodabandeh_Singleton_Tirana_1Open Minds – Explaining Radicalisation for Prevent and Channel

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http://iran-interlink.ca/?mod=view&id=9814

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) from Iran-Interlink visits Camp New Iraq (Formerly Ashraf) in wake of violence by loyalists of the Rajavi cult

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf 2011

Iran Interlink, Baghdad, April 17, 2011: … It is thought that up to 200 MEK members loyal to Massoud Rajavi took part in the violence. It is not known how many of the 3400 residents at the camp continue as members of the terrorist group.   Singleton visited the camp at the start of a week of meetings with Iraqi officials to demand that the organisational infrastructure of the group be dismantled, and that the leaders are prosecuted under Iraqi and international law. The remaining residents should be enabled to determine their own futures without pressure from the MEK leaders. Their families should be involved to help in this process. Over 1000 Camp New Iraq (Formerly Ashraf) residents have residency or citizenship rights in Europe and North America …

http://www.iran-interlink.org/?mod=view&id=9772

Iran Interlink, Baghdad, April 17, 2011
https://iran-interlink.org

Anne khodabndeh (Singleton) from Iran-Interlink visited Camp New Iraq (Formerly Ashraf) in the wake of violent clashes between MEK loyalists and Iraqi security forces. The Iraqi commander in charge of the camp showed some of the pre-manufactured missiles used by the MEK as they attacked Iraqi soldiers at the base.

It is thought that up to 200 MEK members loyal to Massoud Rajavi took part in the violence. It is not known how many of the 3400 residents at the camp continue as members of the terrorist group.

Human Rights organisations have called for an independent investigation into events at the camp.

Singleton visited the camp at the start of a week of meetings with Iraqi officials to demand that the organisational infrastructure of the group be dismantled, and that the leaders are prosecuted under Iraqi and international law. The remaining residents should be enabled to determine their own futures without pressure from the MEK leaders. Their families should be involved to help in this process. Over 1000 Camp New Iraq (Formerly Ashraf) residents have residency or citizenship rights in Europe and North America. The embassies of these countries can facilitate their return.

Detailed reports will follow soon
Iran Interlink, Baghdad, April 17 2011

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf 2011Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf 2011
Large metal missiles pre-manufactured by MEK in readiness for violent clashes with Iraqi military


MEK used different coloured headgear to coordinate place and timing of pre-planned actions

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf 2011
Small metal missiles catapulted at soldiers and observers from inside the camp by Rajavi loyalists

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf 2011

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf 2011

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf 2011

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf massacre 2011

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf massacre 2011

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf massacre 2011

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf massacre 2011

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Also
https://iran-interlink.org/?mod=view&id=9842

MEK expert Anne Khodabndeh (Singleton) outlines plan to close Camp Ashraf

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf massacre 2011… Singleton explained that while there is no doubt in anybody’s mind that the MEK must be removed from Iraq by the end of 2011 – as three successive democratically elected governments have demanded since December 2003, as the Iraqi constitution demands and as the status of forces agreement (SOFA) dictates – it is becoming clear that the MEK is a unique phenomenon which cannot be treated as a normal political or military entity and therefore its removal will not be a straightforward mission. Evidence of this has already been seen in the violent resistance to attempts by Iraqi security forces to bring the MEK into line with Iraqi law both in July 2009 and on April 8 this year …

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf massacre 2011

Al-Mostanseriah University Baghdad, April 2011
Reported by Sahar Family Foundation, Baghdad, April 25, 2011
http://www.saharngo.com/en/story/1433

Anne Singleton visited Iraq as representative of Iran-Interlink at the invitation of the Baladiyeh Foundation, a human rights NGO based in Baghdad. The Baladiyeh Foundation, headed by Mrs Ahlam al-Maliki, provides humanitarian assistance to a wide range of deprived sectors of Iraqi society arising directly from the invasion and occupation of Iraq by allied forces in 2003.

Baladiyeh Foundation is concerned by the humanitarian crisis at Camp Ashraf caused by the group’s leaders who are refusing to allow access to human rights organisations to verify the wellbeing of all of the camp’s residents.

Anne Singleton, a leading expert on the Mojahedin-e Khalq terrorist cult, was invited to speak at al-Mostanserieh University in Baghdad to address the problem of removing the group from Iraq.

Singleton outlined the problem which the Government of Iraq faces, telling the audience that the MEK has been used, particularly by neoconservatives and Zionists in the west, to interfere in the internal affairs of Iraq since 2003 when the group mistakenly came under the protection of US forces (the MEK is listed as a terrorist entity in the USA). Since that time, Camp Ashraf has remained the only part of the repressive infrastructure of the former dictator Saddam Hussein which has not been dismantled. In this respect, explained Singleton, the camp has been the locus for training and facilitating violent insurrectionists determined to derail the democratisation process of Iraq. The aim of the violence has been to create sectarian, tribal and religious divisions in Iraqi society which would prevent the unification and progression of the country under a freely elected government. The MEK have acted in conjunction with various Saddamists (Iraqis loyal to the beliefs of the former dictator) and elements in the west in this respect.

Since 2009 when the government of Iraq took over responsibility for protecting the camp from the US military, it has been possible to clamp down on this activity and the result has been a dramatic reduction in the amount of violent activity in the country. However, efforts to remove the group from Iraq as demanded by the Iraqi constitution have been hampered for several reasons.

Singleton explained that while there is no doubt in anybody’s mind that the MEK must be removed from Iraq by the end of 2011 – as three successive democratically elected governments have demanded since December 2003, as the Iraqi constitution demands and as the status of forces agreement (SOFA) dictates – it is becoming clear that the MEK is a unique phenomenon which cannot be treated as a normal political or military entity and therefore its removal will not be a straightforward mission. Evidence of this has already been seen in the violent resistance to attempts by Iraqi security forces to bring the MEK into line with Iraqi law both in July 2009 and on April 8 this year.

Negotiations with the MEK will not resolve the problem explained Anne Singleton, since these talks only address the interests of one person, that is, the MEK leader Massoud Rajavi who is still in hiding in Camp Ashraf. Although he has ordered his loyal followers to violently resist any attempts by the government of Iraq to impose Iraqi law on the camp, it has become clear that only a small number of the camp’s residents are involved in these violent activities. Tens of individuals who have escaped the camp since the 2009 handover all report that most of the camp’s residents are no longer willing or able to continue as members of the terrorist group. It is vital therefore, said Singleton, for an independent agency such as the United Nations Human Rights Commission, to be able to enter the camp without interference, and to conduct a survey of the camp’s residents. This can only be achieved if the MEK leaders are separated from the rank and file and each individual is given the freedom to choose their own future. In this way, the residents of the camp can be removed from Iraqi territory without the violence and bloodshed which is being threatened by Massoud Rajavi.

Iraq is a sovereign country and is capable of resolving this issue in a humanitarian way which will reflect well on this new democracy. The involvement of human rights groups like Baladiyeh Foundation, said Singleton, is a sure sign that the country of Iraq has the confidence and competence to deal with the problem of the MEK effectively and peacefully. The sticking point will be the reaction of western governments which can either help or hinder this process. Above all, it is vital that the UN and other international human rights agencies fully comprehend that the only legitimate human rights position in relation to Camp Ashraf and its residents it to demand the immediate and unconditional organisational disbandment of the group, and to deal with each of the residents as a separate person and not as a slave belonging to Rajavi’s terrorist group.

Almostanserieh paper on Mojahedin Khalq (Anne Singleton)2011

Link to download video file (61 MB)

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Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf massacre 2011

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf massacre 2011

Anne Khodabandeh (Singleton) Iraq Camp Ashraf massacre 2011

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