Separating Children from Parents in the Cult of Rajavi

Separating Children from Parents in the Cult of Rajavi

Separating Children from Parents in the Cult of RajaviHabilian Association, September 09 2021:… In the history of religious and destructive cults, children have always been the first victims. Whereas, among militant political groups around the world, there are few cases whose stories are as tied to children as the Mojahedin-e Khalq Organization (MeK). In 1990 and 1991, the MeK separated about 700 children from their parents and sent them to European countries via the Jordanian border. Rajavi did this without the heartfelt consent of the children’s parents. Separating Children from Parents in the Cult of Rajavi

Separating Children from Parents in the Cult of RajaviFamilies In MEK Cult

Separating Children from Parents in the Cult of Rajavi

In the history of religious and destructive cults, children have always been the first victims. Whereas, among militant political groups around the world, there are few cases whose stories are as tied to children as the Mojahedin-e Khalq Organization (MeK).

In 1990 and 1991, the MeK separated about 700 children from their parents and sent them to European countries via the Jordanian border. Rajavi did this without the heartfelt consent of the children’s parents.

During the war with Kuwait, Massoud Rajavi separated these children from their parents and sent them to European countries under the pretext of creating a safe environment for them.

MEK and Children – Mhtab Nayeb Agha & Fatemeh Akbarinasab

Why Rajavi separated children from families?

In the second ideological revolution, which included forced divorce, Massoud did not have much success in the lower echelons of the organization. The inferior members opposed this order, using their children as an excuse to reject separation from their emotional partners. Therefore, Massoud who saw children as a great threat to his so-called ideological revolution thought of removing them.

The winter of 1990 coincided with the First Persian Gulf War. While Saddam was severely weakened, Massoud Rajavi used the dangerous conditions of war to achieve his sinister goals.

In fact, he was trying to carry out his sinister plan to remove the children, the enemies of the ideological revolution, from the territory of Iraq in order to guarantee his intended revolution.

Therefore, in the first step, the schools, recreation centers, and other nests of the members’ children, who numbered more than 700, were closed under the pretext of war condition. Then, they were transported to the anti-missile barracks inside the camp in fear and panic, with minimal means of survival and psychologically vulnerable conditions.

After a few weeks, the children became accustomed to the new situation, and the organization’s trick to forcibly relocate the children failed, and the parents still refused to separate them.

This time, the organization’s officials took cruel action and transferred the innocent children to Baghdad, the center of the airstrikes. Numerous bombings and the endangerment of children’s lives made it easier for the organization’s officials to obtain parental consent. So many of parents were content to move their children wherever the organization deemed expedient.

The first refuge for children after leaving Iraq was Amman, the capital of Jordan. There, the children, who had been in love with each other for years, were sent in groups to various European countries especially Scandinavian countries, Australia, Canada and the United States. Of those, more than 200 children entered Germany illegally under the pretext of leaving the Persian Gulf war. Germany was the second-largest children’s destination after Jordan.

During the presence of children in Germany, the MeK received millions of marks annually from child support associations. Children were returned to Iraq at the age of 16 after receiving organizational and ideological training.

MEK and Children – Yaser Akbarinasab and Marjan Akbarian

Why did Rajavi return young children to Iraq?

After sending the kids to European countries, the organization did not allow any contact between the parents and their children. Rajavi pursued some goals for returning them, such as infusing new blood into the organization which was faced with a manpower crisis. On a deeper level, in Rajavi’s eyes, it was the last chance to return those children who had their parents killed in previous operations since all of them were transferred under pseudonyms and fake identities, and as soon as they reached the legal age, they refused to return or in case of a return, they could apply to leave because they had the original card and identity. Therefore, Rajavi was able to transfer many of the children who had been transferred abroad.

Link to the source

MEK and Children – Alan Mohammadi

Separating Children from Parents in the Cult of Rajavi 

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https://iran-interlink.org/wordpress/the-mek-and-children-hanif-bali/

The MEK and Children – Hanif Bali

Mek and Children – Hanif BaliNejat Society, October 02 2020:… Hanif arraived in Sweden when he was three years old and moved between eight different families until he turned 18. He spoke of his several moms, “When I was told “your mom”, I had to ask “Which mom?” because I had several moms. “. Hanif is a successful Swedish citizen now because he is one of those few lucky MEK children who was not returned to Camp Ashraf, Iraq, to receive military training. Mek and Children – Hanif Bali

Hanif Bali: I was lucky that I didn’t get back to the MKOI was lucky that I didn’t get back to the MKO! (Mojahedin Khalq, Rajavi cult)

The MEK and Children – Hanif Bali

Separating Children from Parents in the Cult of Rajavi 

Hanif moved between eight different families until he turned 18

He has been a member of Sweden Parliament since 2010 but he was born in Kermanshah, Iran in 1987. Three years later in Camp Ashraf, his Mujahed parents left him in the hands of the agents of the Mujahedin Khalq Organization (the MKO, MEK, PMOI, Cult of Rajavi) to take Hanif to Europe together with hundreds of other children of the MEK members.

Mek and Children – Hanif Bali

Hanif Bali

Hanif is a successful Swedish citizen now because he is one of those few lucky MEK children who was not returned to Camp Ashraf, Iraq, to receive military training. However, in an interview with Manoto TV in 2016, he recounted heartbreaking stories of his childhood as an orphan in a foreign country. This is what he said about his biological parents: “Mothers were allowed to call their children only once a year. My father has called me only twice in my entire life.”

Mek and Children – Hanif Bali

Hanif arraived in Sweden when he was three years old and moved between eight different families until he turned 18. He spoke of his several moms, “When I was told “your mom”, I had to ask “Which mom?” because I had several moms. “

Today, you can find out a few new details of Hanif’s challenging childhood among his diverse parents and families. On May 2017, he wrote a short caption for a photo of himself by the side of his biological father on his Instagram account: “I met my biological father at 13:30. I do not think DNA test is necessary” (referring to their high resemblance).

Another significant photo shows baby Hanif next to another man. The clarifying caption explains his controversial life far from his biological parents:

“In my entire childhood, I had a lot of fathers. Father is not always biologic or the one who you lived with more or the one who was kinder or more violent than others. Sometimes your dad can be the one who you had the most challenging relationship with but he was the same person who you knew profoundly and loved the most. I have portraits of several fathers in my mind but I had only one dad. I miss him every day.”

The MEK and Children – Hanif Bali

Separating Children from Parents in the Cult of Rajavi 

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https://iran-interlink.org/wordpress/cultish-behaviour-in-mek-mandatory-uniform/

Cultish Behaviour In MEK – Mandatory Uniform

Cultish Behaviour In MEK - Mandatory Uniform Habilian Association, August 27 2021:… Within the cult, hijab is limited to scarves, and women are not allowed to use other types of clothing such as shawls or hats, etc. The only colors that they could choose for their scarves were green, red, and khaki. Women could wear red and khaki scarves only in certain places, and if someone wanted to wear a red or khaki scarf outside the Mojahedin propaganda ceremonies, she would be reprimanded. Cultish Behaviour In MEK

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Cultish Behaviour InMujahedin-e-Khalq MEK – Mandatory Uniform

If you look at cults from the outside, they look attractive, but when exploring them, there will be unseen angles that the cults do not want to be known. Seeking deceptive attraction, cult leaders want obedience, time, and, in a word, the lives of members. Cults use sophisticated mind control and recruitment techniques that have evolved over time.

To get rid of the cult’s appeal, you need to know how they work and what techniques they use. In most cases, the belief system of a religion is used as a tool for the use of techniques. In free societies, people can believe in anything they want, say whatever they think, and dress and wear whatever they want, but this is not the case in cults.

Cultish Behaviour In MEK - Mandatory Uniform

Cultish Behaviour In MEK – Mandatory Uniform

Mandatory Uniform

One of the cults which is known to the Iranian people is the Mojahedin-e Khalq Organization (MEK), a terrorist group that presents itself as a political opposition and in terms of organizing and employing individuals has all features of a cult. Originated in a Shiite country, this terrorist cult uses the cover of Islam and the tools of the Shiite religion to maintain the framework and structure of its organization. An important rule of Islamic sharia is the hijab of women, but the MeK uses this as a technique to control members.

“Rajavi said that your sisters’ headscarf is the border between the Revolutionary Mujahideen and the counter-revolutionary bourgeoisie,” said Ali Shirzad, a former member of the MeK. [1]

“The red color of the scarf in the uniform of the Mojahedin Khalq has been borrowed from Marxism. The green overcoats belong to the Castro and Che Guevara wars in Cuba. although covering the Shari’a, the hijab of women in the uniforms, is merely a declaration of allegiance to the religion of the masses. Fewer photos of MEK women have been published in a variety of colors and clothing. Of course, this restriction has not been imposed on non-members who attend MEK gatherings,” said Majid Mohammadi, a current member of MeK. [2]

“Women who entered the cult were told very openly: The headscarf is the official (i.e., mandatory) form of this organization,” said Zahra Sadat Mirbagheri; a dissident member of the MeK. [3]

Character assassination to create a sense of guilt

“In Rajavi’s establishment, all women should wear headscarves. Even if the headscarves were a little behind and a little of the woman’s hair was visible, they initially were warned and then became slandered. Yes, Maryam Rajavi used to spread repression in a new and creepy way, and this oppression is still present in the relations of the Rajavi’s cult,” Zahra Sadat Mirbagheri said. [4]

Hijab; a means of control the women present at the headquarters of this group must wear a certain type of uniform with a certain color.

This is while leaders of this group, who control a so-called political opposition, in their statements about the government in Iran condemn the obligatory hijab in the country.

Maryam Rajavi’s “Ten Point Plan for Future Iran” states: “We believe in complete gender equality in political, social and economic arenas. We are also committed to the equal participation of women in political leadership. Any form of discrimination against women will be abolished. They will enjoy the right to freely choose their clothing. They are free in marriage, divorce, education, and employment.” [5]

Following the MeK’s escape and transfer to France, Iraq (Camp Ashraf and Camp Liberty and parallel camps) and finally to Albania (Camp Mans) and setting up organizational camps to maintain and deepen relations, we see that no female member of the organization is allowed to cover or uncover the hijab, even in women’s dormitories and restaurants.

“Within the cult, hijab is limited to scarves, and women are not allowed to use other types of clothing such as shawls or hats, etc. The only colors that they could choose for their scarves were green, red, and khaki. Women could wear red and khaki scarves only in certain places, and if someone wanted to wear a red or khaki scarf outside the Mojahedin propaganda ceremonies, she would be reprimanded,” said Zahra Sadat Mirbagheri. [6]

All that has been said, along with other cultish tactics, such as fear and intimidation, mind control, information control, long work hours and sleep deprivation, and forced public confessions has turned this organization into a cult with a terrorist approach that is far more dangerous than an ordinary terrorist group.

Sources:
[1] Ali Shirzad, Vatanam Iran Blog, January 8, 2019
[2] Majid Mohammadi, Independent Persian, September 4, 2016
[3], [4 [, [6] Zahra Sadat Mirbagheri, Facebook page, January 3, 2014
[5] Website of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran

Link to the source

Cultish Behaviour In Mujahedin-e-Khalq MEK – Mandatory Uniform 

Separating Children from Parents in the Cult of Rajavi

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